Nature

The Indian government is pushing a bold proposal that would make scholarly literature accessible for free to everyone in the country. The government wants to negotiate with the world’s biggest scientific publishers to set up nationwide subscriptions, rather than many agreements with individual institutions that only scholars can use, say researchers consulting the government. The
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Andean communities are turning to quinoa during today’s pandemic and climate change crises, with traditional quinoa preserving the heritage of local biodiversity in this region. Indigenous Andean communities have planted quinoa for seven millennia, and the deserted highlands that serve as their home have been declared by the UN as a GIAHS, or Globally Important
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Many voters waited hours to cast ballots in US primaries this spring.Credit: Al Drago/Reuters Democratizing Our Data: A Manifesto Julia Lane MIT Press (2020) The Web was invented 30 years ago, yet 2020 is the first year that the United States’ decennial census has allowed households to respond online. This shift came in the nick
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Windship Technology announced its wind propulsion system project on ships expected to save fuel by up to 30 percent. It already has a test ship ready. Windship Tech is a company advocating wind propulsion. (Photo: Pixabay)Windship Technology recently announced that it is working on wind propulsion systems that could save fuel consumption by up to 30%.   First Test Ship
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Many multicellular animals respond to disease-causing agents, termed pathogens, using an evolutionarily conserved defence pathway called the cGAS–STING pathway1,2. Reports in the past few years of cGAS- and STING-like proteins in bacteria raised the possibility that this pathway is more evolutionarily ancient than was previously thought3–5. Writing in Nature, Morehouse et al.6 demonstrate that a
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I became fascinated by bats in 2011, after I started working with them in Central Amazonia. But this photo was taken near Ranomafana National Park in eastern Madagascar, during an expedition organized by the University of Helsinki. My colleague, Adrià López-Baucells, and I led the bat research. I am in the white T-shirt. We had
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There were no readily accessible oxygen billions of years in Earth’s past, and scientists now think that arsenic, a known poison, may have helped early life on our planet breathe. In the Atacama Desert in Chile, in Laguna La Brava, researchers study photosynthetic microorganisms that live in a hyper-saline lake that is permanently and utterly devoid of oxygen. They published their research
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A magnitude 4.2 earthquake hit Istanbul on Thursday afternoon, 4:38 pm local time. The quake caused locals of the most populous city to panic momentarily. The quake hit the Marmara Sea, off the coastal town of Marmara Ereğlisi at a depth of 6.8 kilometers. No damage or casualties have been reported.  The earthquakes of the recent
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Camp Ashland is set to be rebuilt after successive waves of destructive floods damaged it, with a project worth $35 Million being granted recently for this purpose. It will be the Camp’s centerpiece project under the $62 Million flood reconstruction project for the Camp.  Resiliency Through Disasters The Camp experienced several waves of disasters, including two devastating floods
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Hello Nature readers, would you like to get this Briefing in your inbox free every day? Sign up here Protesters call for an end to COVID-19-based restrictions in Sacramento, California.Credit: Stanton Sharpe/SOPA Images/LightRocket/Getty Several ongoing coronavirus-vaccine trials — from Moderna, Pfizer and the University of Oxford–AstraZeneca — could announce game-changing results next month. Here are
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The EPA made a recent statement denying the adverse effects of pesticide chlorpyrifos on children’s brain development. This new pronouncement directly contradicts federal researchers’ scientific conclusions five years ago, who stated that the chemical stunts brain development. Chlorpyrifos is present in grapes, almonds, soybeans, and other crops. The new statement is excellent news and is a significant win for the
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Firefighters and volunteers in the Pantanal, Brazil, have been scrambling to rescue jaguars from extreme fires.Credit: Andre Penner/AP/Shutterstock When Luciana Leite arrived in the Pantanal on 2 September, she thought she would be celebrating her wedding anniversary. Instead, the biologist and her husband spent their eight-day planned holiday aiding volunteers and firefighters struggling to extinguish
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Protestors call for an end to COVID-19-based restrictions in Sacramento, California.Credit: Stanton Sharpe/SOPA Images/LightRocket/Getty Several ongoing coronavirus-vaccine trials could announce game-changing results next month. But as anticipation grows, concerns are growing about whether the vaccines will clear safety trials, what they will achieve if they do and the risk that the approval process will be
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A new five-year pilot, carbon market program, is organized to provide conservation funding for land trusts to alleviate climate change. This is a project of the Land Trust Alliance. The climate Trust and Finite Carbon serve as project partners. Project Objectives This program is intended to allow small land trusts with forest lands to join the carbon market voluntarily. They will
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1. Walsh, C. T., Garneau-Tsodikova, S. & Gatto, G. J., Jr. Protein posttranslational modifications: the chemistry of proteome diversifications. Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 44, 7342–7372 (2005). CAS  Google Scholar  2. Deribe, Y. L., Pawson, T. & Dikic, I. Post-translational modifications in signal integration. Nat. Struct. Mol. Biol. 17, 666 (2010). CAS  PubMed  Google Scholar  3.
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A Cuvier’s Beaked Whale’s Diving record of three hours and 42 minutes astounded researchers and marked the incident as the longest dive not only for the whales but for all mammals.  Researchers from Duke University Marine Laboratory in Beaufort, N.C recorded a recent beaked whale’s dive, which broke the previous record of more than two
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Credit: Getty Making course material accessible to students whose first language is not English can make the course better for everyone. In 2016, I was teaching an undergraduate chemistry class at Central Washington University in Ellensburg and, after grading the first exam, noticed that some international students were failing the course. They sat together in
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A couple of prolific Andean condors give conservationists much optimism that the species would survive the pressures of poisoning and hunting, and may even thrive and bring more condors chicks to the world.  Andean Condors inhabits Andes mountain ranges along the Pacific coast region of western South America, Colombia, northwestern Venezuela, and Tierra del Fuego
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Ruddy turnstones (Arenaria interpres) drawn by Justine Hirten.Credit: Justine Lee Hirten Whether in papers, posters or public display, science often benefits from good illustration and graphic design. A grasp of visual communication and a talent for showing information are important skills, but most scientists never receive any formal training in them. Nature sought advice from
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1. Kim, S. et al. Maternal gut bacteria promote neurodevelopmental abnormalities in mouse offspring. Nature 549, 528–532 (2017). ADS  PubMed  PubMed Central  Article  CAS  Google Scholar  2. Buffington, S. A. et al. Microbial reconstitution reverses maternal diet-induced social and synaptic deficits in offspring. Cell 165, 1762–1775 (2016). CAS  PubMed  PubMed Central  Article  Google Scholar  3.
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What qualifies as a penis in many members of the animal kingdom? In this article, the various kinds of “penises” and their functions in and out of mating are discussed. What Makes a Penis? For vertebrates, including humans, a penis is relatively easy to pinpoint. Unfortunately, this is not the case for many invertebrates.  We may define a
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A rare tropical species of Heteroptera equipped with long antennae was discovered by an international research team, including St Petersburg University scientists. New Southeast Asian Species The team discovered the bug, which was classified into a new genus. It came from Southeast Asia’s Borneo island and was named Tatupa grafei, classifying it in the Miridae family of plant
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Demonstrators march at Indiana University Bloomington to protest against police violence during the Black Lives Matter protests.Source: Rodney Margison/ZUMA Wire/Shutterstock Sparked by the global reaction to the police killing of George Floyd, an unarmed Black man, in Minneapolis, Minnesota, in May, universities, departments and faculty members rapidly issued statements and policies highlighting their commitment to
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Autumn on the Arctic tundra, which is becoming a deeper shade of green in some places as temperatures climb. Credit: Getty Climate change 22 September 2020 Climate change drives vegetation gains in patches of the high Arctic tundra. Parts of the treeless Arctic tundra have become greener as rising temperatures stimulate plant growth. Low-resolution satellite
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In some regions, warm winds pushed the edge of the Arctic sea ice further north than ever before this year.Credit: AP/Shutterstock This year, Arctic sea ice shrank to its second-lowest extent in more than 40 years of satellite measurements. On 15 September, ice covered just 3.74 million square kilometres of Arctic waters at its annual
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A high number of fish deaths occurred in Israel that scientists think may be caused by a combination of bacterial infection and stress from a rapid temperature rise in marine waters. Marine ecosystems have been profoundly affected by the continuously increasing temperatures of the oceans. A new study published in the journal PNAS has found evidence that the rate of warming onset instead of peak warming may
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Net Zero Dieter Helm William Collins (2020) Climate-change economist Dieter Helm was frustrated by a widely repeated claim from the UK Committee on Climate Change: “By reducing emissions produced in the UK to zero, we also end our contribution to rising global temperatures.” Not so, he objects: consumers also import goods and services from countries
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Authorities from Botswana said that the death of a hundred elephant deaths in the country earlier this year is due to cyanobacteria toxins from water holes.  Testing the waterholes for algal bloom next rainy season to reduce the risk of another mass die-off is in order, Mmadi Reuben, the principal veterinary officer at the Botswana
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Marcia McNutt, president of the US National Academy of Sciences, says that the NAS hasn’t received any sexual harassment complaints against its members since instituting a reporting system last year.Credit: Karen Sayre/Eikon Photography (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0) Last year, the US National Academy of Sciences (NAS) voted overwhelmingly to amend its by-laws so that it could
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A new satellite has been launched to monitor greenhouse gas methane emissions, which is involved in anthropogenic climate change. It has been tested and shows promise in helping to fight global warming. (Photo: Pixabay)A new satellite has been launched to monitor emissions of the greenhouse gas methane, which is involved in anthropogenic climate change. It
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2020: Protesters elide vaccination, 5G mobile-phone technology and face masks in Spain, where COVID-19 rates are soaring.Credit: Marcos del Mazo/LightRocket via Getty Anti-vaxxers: How to Challenge a Misinformed Movement Jonathan M. Berman MIT Press (2020) The need to control outbreaks and pandemics has long created tensions between liberty and interdependence, similar to those playing out
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Zhongguancun Park in Beijing, where science and business meet.Credit: Imaginechina Limited/Alamy What makes a science city, let alone a leading science city? Many factors come to mind, such as a high R&D spend, a concentration of research institutions and specialist science facilities, and an ability to attract global science talent. By our measure, the top
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In the continued search for life on Venus and other places in the solar system, a British research team discovered that the rancid and toxic phosphine gas that comes from microbes might exist in Venus’s acidic and burning atmosphere. Jane Greaves, an astronomer from Cardiff University and research team leader, said it should not be present on Venus due to the photochemical
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The Lunar Palace 1 laboratory simulating a lunar environment at Beihang University, Beijing.Credit: AFP/Getty When Zhu Dongqiang moved from Nanjing to Beijing five years ago, he continued applying for joint grants with his former colleagues, travelling 1,000 km south each summer for teahouse discussions about research ideas. Nanjing University, where Zhu was a professor of
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A researcher with mosquitoes at the Sun Yat-Sen University-Michigan State University Joint Center of Vector Control for Tropical Disease in Guangzhou, China.Credit: Kevin Frayer/Getty Two trends are emerging as science globalization accelerates: the spread of research hubs beyond the traditional concentrations of Boston, London and Paris, and a rapid increase in international collaborations. The established
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Illustration: Youssef Khalil 1. Beijing Population: 20.5 million GDP per capita: US$23,800 Share 2019: 2,846.4 Change in adjusted Share 2015–19: +40.8% Count 2019: 6,018 Sources: Nature Index, opendatanetwork.com, sina.com, Wikipedia. Data analysis: Bo Wu. Infographic: Tanner Maxwell. Despite substantial progress towards clearing them, Beijing’s notoriously polluted skies remain one of its biggest public policy and
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A scientist at Moderna, in Massachusetts, which has a promising COVID-19 vaccine candidate.Credit: David L. Ryan/The Boston Globe/Getty When Barry Bluestone moved to Boston, Massachusetts, in 1971 to take a job teaching economics at Boston College, the city was “in terrible shape”, he says, with high rates of poverty and unemployment. He took a rundown
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