Nature

Hello Nature readers, would you like to get this Briefing in your inbox free every day? Sign up here Although thought to be the most abundant vertebrates on Earth, little is known about the species of bristlemouths that inhabit the oceans’ twilight zone.Credit: Solvin Zankl/NPL The vast, wild depths of the ocean’s middle layer face
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In this roundtable, our panel discusses reporting on the ongoing coronavirus outbreak. Download MP3 In this edition of Backchat we take a deep dive into Nature’s coverage of coronavirus. As cases climb, what are some of the challenges involved in reporting on the virus? Never miss an episode: Subscribe to the Nature Podcast on Apple
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Traditional shopping can be less climate-friendly than online shopping. Credit: Getty Environmental sciences 28 February 2020 Dropping money at bricks-and-mortar shops can have a bigger carbon footprint than some forms of e-commerce. To cut the carbon footprint of your online purchases, have them delivered by local stores. As low-cost, fast-shipping e-commerce sites proliferate, consumers have
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A recent study by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) reveals that Colorado River has dried up by twenty percent, and may lose approximately one-fourth of its natural flow by 2050 as temperature increases. Scientists point to the melting of snowpack due to warmer temperature and lack of precipitation as the culprit of the river’s decreasing flow. The
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Hurricane aftermath left the mangroves of Everglades National Park battered, yet it helped the mangrove forests   by bringing in nutrient-rich soil from sediments and added elevations, making it more resilient to sea level rise.  This sums up the findings of scientists in its study report to the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) last February
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More open science is more likely to settle the debate over the existence of hidden rooms behind Tutankhamun’s tomb.Credit: Khaled Desouki/AFP/Getty The discovery of possible hidden rooms behind the walls of Tutankhamun’s tomb in Egypt’s Valley of the Kings generated many headlines last week. A team of researchers used ground-penetrating radar (GPR) to scan the
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Seen from a monitoring tower above the treetops near Manaus in the Brazilian Amazon, the rainforest canopy stretches to the horizon as an endless sea of green. It looks like a rich and healthy ecosystem, but appearances are deceiving. This rainforest — which holds 16,000 separate tree species — is slowly drying out. Over the
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Many of the world’s hardest problems can be tackled only with data-intensive, computer-assisted research. And I’d speculate that the vast majority of research data are never published. Huge sums of taxpayer funds go to waste because such data cannot be reused. Policies for data reuse are falling into place, but fixing the situation will require
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Peer review is the defining feature of scholarly communication. In a 2018 survey of more than 11,000 researchers, 98% said that they considered peer review important or extremely important for ensuring the quality and integrity of scholarly communication1. Indeed, now that the Internet and social media have assumed journals’ original role of dissemination, a journal’s
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You wouldn’t expect coral-reef research to be taking place in a broom cupboard. But that’s what we’re doing at the Horniman Museum and Gardens in London. The museum was built in 1901 and has botanical gardens, collections devoted to natural history, anthropology, music — and a tiny aquarium space that I can sprint around in
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The Marine Biological Laboratory in Woods Hole, Massachusetts.Credit: Shutterstock For the past few years, graduate students applying for a prestigious summer course at the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) in the harbourside town of Woods Hole, Massachusetts, have been quietly warned about the course’s co-director — Richard Schneider. In 2013, an investigation at his institution, the
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The Hungarian Natural History Museum in Budapest is in a nineteenth-century building called the Ludovica Academy.Credit: Julian Pottage/Alamy A battle is under way between scientists in Hungary and the nation’s government over Budapest’s 200-year-old natural-history museum. The government wants to move the valuable collection, which contains more than 10 million items that are important for
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(Photo : Pixabay/mariamichelle)Coral reefs need urgent attention as a huge percentage of it has been destroyed, risking underwater life. Scientists suggest that 70- 90% of all existing coral reef habitat will be eliminated over the next 20 years due to rising sea temperatures and acidic waters. To curb this, some groups are transplanting live corals
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Researchers first spotted this rocky outcrop in Pine Island Bay, West Antarctica, in early February.Credit: Gui Bortolotto A scientific expedition off the coast of Antarctica earlier this month spotted an island that appears on no maps — a finding that demonstrates how quickly the continent is changing as a result of climate change. “I think
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The petroleum-based adhesives used to make plywood could be replaced by a soya-based formula. Credit: Alamy Organic chemistry 21 February 2020 Chemists have borrowed a strategy from plant cell walls to produce a high-strength wood adhesive. An element that props up plants’ cell walls can turn soya protein into a strong and eco-friendly glue. The
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Hello Nature readers, would you like to get this Briefing in your inbox free every day? Sign up here Escherichia coli bacteria, coloured green, in a scanning electron micrograph.Credit: Stephanie Schuller/SPL A machine-learning approach has spotted powerful new types of antibiotic from a pool of more than 100 million molecules, including one that works against
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Methane bubbles trapped in ice. Methane that has long been stored in frozen ground is unlikely to be released in sufficient amounts to accelerate climate change. Credit: Alamy Climate change 21 February 2020 Bubbles in Antarctic ice suggest that warming will not result in massive release of long-buried methane. Runaway global warming driven by the
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Parallel to the rapid spread of coronavirus from Wuhan China to 25 countries across the globe, spread of myths and even scientific studies with no peer reviews or ‘preprints’ on the novel virus has become viral and is contributing to fear and panic across the globe. Even public health scientists have issued a statement condemning
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Researchers taught a neural network to recognize a type of knot called a 31, which can be modelled as a string of beads (left) or a string of rods (right). Credit: O. Vandans et al./Phys. Rev. E Physics 21 February 2020 After training, an artificial-intelligence program can distinguish between five types of knot with 99%
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A robotic submersible surfaces near the Nathaniel B. Palmer ice-breaker at Thwaites Glacier.Credit: Johan Rolandsson Taking advantage of rare ice-free waters in West Antarctica last February, scientists got their first look underneath Thwaites Glacier, a massive and increasingly unstable formation perched at the edge of the continent. What they saw only increased fears of a
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Researchers want to know how many people with the coronavirus don’t have symptoms.Credit: Stringer/Getty Researchers are concerned that China’s official reports on the number of coronavirus infections have not been including people who have tested positive for the virus but who have no symptoms. They fear the practice is masking the epidemic’s true scale. But
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The thousands of islands in the Aegean Sea between Greece and Turkey have inspired countless myths and works of literature. This region is also where the word archipelago, which means a group of islands, has its roots. Archipelagos and their constituent islands have long been viewed as natural ‘laboratories’ for developing and testing theories that
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The fine-structure splitting of the n = 2 states of hydrogen is the separation of the 2P3/2 and 2P1/2 levels at zero magnetic field. This splitting, predicted by the Dirac theory of relativistic quantum mechanics11, originates from the spin–orbit interaction between the non-zero orbital angular momentum (L = 1) and the electron spin. The ‘classic’ Lamb shift is defined
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Cured Jeffrey Rediger Flatiron (2020) An experienced physician who is also a skilled, driven and compassionate writer is a winning combination. This pioneering book by psychiatrist Jeffrey Rediger analyses unexplained spontaneous recoveries from potentially fatal medical conditions, including cancer. From interviewing patients over nearly two decades, Rediger concludes that each recovery was “unique” and only
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River systems, such as this one in China, need better protection from encroaching industrialization.Credit: Costfoto/Barcroft Media/Getty Most measures of biodiversity suggest that things are going badly wrong. Some one million plant and animal species face extinction, according to the Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES). And French President Emmanuel Macron last week
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Credit: Adapted from Getty The day after she submitted a grant proposal last November, Sarah McNaughton listed all the tactics she could think of to boost her chances of success next time. “I expect to be rejected,” says McNaughton. “It is the exception to get funded, not the rule.” Publishing key papers and forging new
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Officials want to know roughly when the outbreak will peak so they can prepare hospitals.Credit: SOPA Images/LightRocket/Getty Coronavirus infections in China continue to swell by thousands a day, prompting epidemiologists to estimate when the outbreak will peak. Some suggest the climax, when the number of new infections in a single day reaches its highest point,
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As a marine ecologist at the University of Tasmania in Hobart, Australia, I make about 150 dives a year, looking for threatened marine species. I focus on animals and plants that go largely unnoticed: small crustaceans and fish species such as gobies and blennies that grow 3 or 4 centimetres long. I’m trying to illuminate
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Credit: New York University Archives After the Second World War, mathematics in the United States flourished owing to a convergence of interests. Mathematicians had shown their worth to military and industry patrons, who underwrote far-reaching empires of theories and people, including the consummate problem-solver Louis Nirenberg. One of the world’s most cited and productive mathematicians,
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