Nature

Scientists have recently discovered an animal – the first of its kind to be found – that does not require oxygen in order to live. It is a parasite commonly seen inside salmon, which is its host. The study was recently published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences journal. Henneguya salminicola is a
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Milan’s Duomo cathedral has reopened following temporary closure owing to the spread of coronavirus. Italy has Europe’s largest number of cases.Credit: Valeria Ferraro/SOPA/LightRocket/Getty More than 3,000 recorded deaths and 90,000 confirmed infections, and the numbers are still rising. The coronavirus that causes COVID-19 has spread to more than 70 countries, with more nations being affected
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Sales of hand gels have soared and most supermarkets run out of stocks as the public cope with the rapid spread of coronavirus. But is hand gel truly effective in curbing coronavirus? Health experts explained that generally, sanitizers may be effective against bacteria but not viruses. Hand gels may be used when hand washing is
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In the first weeks of the COVID-19 outbreak, I worked with others to set up capabilities to detect the disease at our National Reference Laboratory in Abuja, and at the Lagos University Teaching Hospital. These cities are the main points of entry into Nigeria — the most populous country in Africa. We detected the country’s
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Credit: Adapted from Getty We are a couple who, in the course of five years, has moved countries and jobs various times and found a way to battle and balance the stress and pressure that academia and science generate on moving. Marc Mallet: In early 2016, during the final year of my PhD programme studying
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Hello Nature readers, would you like to get this Briefing in your inbox free every day? Sign up here Stacked boxes of conference programmes lie unopened at the cancelled American Physical Society meeting.Credit: Davide Castelvecchi/Nature Coronavirus has led to the cancellation of one of the world’s biggest scientific conferences — the March Meeting of the
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It is estimated that around one-third of the global human population1 is infected with the single-celled organism Toxoplasma gondii, a parasite that can be ingested in food or picked up from activities such as gardening2. The parasite needs to differentiate into a chronic-stage form to establish a permanent infection in brain and muscle tissue, but
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A study reveals that despite increased awareness among investors, climate risks from extreme weather events remain unaccounted for in financial markets. Lack of knowledge of this risk could lead to an economic recession in the future. Another study also revealed that extreme hot weather leads to a decline of stock values, illustrating that while climate-related risks may
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Climate litigant Nathan Baring speaks during a Senate Climate Task Force meeting in Washington D.C. in September.Credit: Mark Wilson/Getty Twenty-year-old Nathan Baring is a third-generation Alaskan. Within his lifetime, he has seen winters shorten, cod fisheries collapse and cultural traditions suffer. He grieves for an Arctic that is disappearing before his eyes. “There is a
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The retina’s light-gathering rod and cone cells (beige and green, respectively; artificially coloured) die in people with the inherited disorder retinitis pigmentosa. Credit: Steve Gschmeissner/SPL Gene therapy 28 February 2020 Trial shows the safety of a treatment for X-linked retinitis pigmentosa. Men with an aggressive genetic disease that leads to blindness regained some of their
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Several free online resources can help young scientists to find funding opportunities.Credit: JHU Sheridan Libraries/Gado/Getty Early-career researchers worldwide are are availing themselves of an important but formerly obscure resource: three downloadable databases of hundreds of global funding opportunities and fellowships. The databases — one for graduate students, one for postdoctoral researchers and one for junior
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The Massachusetts biotechnology firm, Moderna, Inc. has developed a potential coronavirus vaccine and shipped its first sample vials to the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) for human testing. The experimental vaccine will be tested on 20 to 25 healthy volunteers by April to test if it is safe and if it produces
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Chinese institutions have been told to stop paying researchers bonuses for publishing in journals, as part of a new national policy to cut perverse incentives that encourage scientists to publish lots of papers rather than focus on high-impact work. In an order released last week, China’s science and education ministries also say that institutions must
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Hello Nature readers, would you like to get this Briefing in your inbox free every day? Sign up here Although thought to be the most abundant vertebrates on Earth, little is known about the species of bristlemouths that inhabit the oceans’ twilight zone.Credit: Solvin Zankl/NPL The vast, wild depths of the ocean’s middle layer face
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In this roundtable, our panel discusses reporting on the ongoing coronavirus outbreak. Download MP3 In this edition of Backchat we take a deep dive into Nature’s coverage of coronavirus. As cases climb, what are some of the challenges involved in reporting on the virus? Never miss an episode: Subscribe to the Nature Podcast on Apple
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Traditional shopping can be less climate-friendly than online shopping. Credit: Getty Environmental sciences 28 February 2020 Dropping money at bricks-and-mortar shops can have a bigger carbon footprint than some forms of e-commerce. To cut the carbon footprint of your online purchases, have them delivered by local stores. As low-cost, fast-shipping e-commerce sites proliferate, consumers have
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A recent study by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) reveals that Colorado River has dried up by twenty percent, and may lose approximately one-fourth of its natural flow by 2050 as temperature increases. Scientists point to the melting of snowpack due to warmer temperature and lack of precipitation as the culprit of the river’s decreasing flow. The
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Hurricane aftermath left the mangroves of Everglades National Park battered, yet it helped the mangrove forests   by bringing in nutrient-rich soil from sediments and added elevations, making it more resilient to sea level rise.  This sums up the findings of scientists in its study report to the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) last February
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More open science is more likely to settle the debate over the existence of hidden rooms behind Tutankhamun’s tomb.Credit: Khaled Desouki/AFP/Getty The discovery of possible hidden rooms behind the walls of Tutankhamun’s tomb in Egypt’s Valley of the Kings generated many headlines last week. A team of researchers used ground-penetrating radar (GPR) to scan the
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Seen from a monitoring tower above the treetops near Manaus in the Brazilian Amazon, the rainforest canopy stretches to the horizon as an endless sea of green. It looks like a rich and healthy ecosystem, but appearances are deceiving. This rainforest — which holds 16,000 separate tree species — is slowly drying out. Over the
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Many of the world’s hardest problems can be tackled only with data-intensive, computer-assisted research. And I’d speculate that the vast majority of research data are never published. Huge sums of taxpayer funds go to waste because such data cannot be reused. Policies for data reuse are falling into place, but fixing the situation will require
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Peer review is the defining feature of scholarly communication. In a 2018 survey of more than 11,000 researchers, 98% said that they considered peer review important or extremely important for ensuring the quality and integrity of scholarly communication1. Indeed, now that the Internet and social media have assumed journals’ original role of dissemination, a journal’s
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You wouldn’t expect coral-reef research to be taking place in a broom cupboard. But that’s what we’re doing at the Horniman Museum and Gardens in London. The museum was built in 1901 and has botanical gardens, collections devoted to natural history, anthropology, music — and a tiny aquarium space that I can sprint around in
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The Marine Biological Laboratory in Woods Hole, Massachusetts.Credit: Shutterstock For the past few years, graduate students applying for a prestigious summer course at the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) in the harbourside town of Woods Hole, Massachusetts, have been quietly warned about the course’s co-director — Richard Schneider. In 2013, an investigation at his institution, the
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The Hungarian Natural History Museum in Budapest is in a nineteenth-century building called the Ludovica Academy.Credit: Julian Pottage/Alamy A battle is under way between scientists in Hungary and the nation’s government over Budapest’s 200-year-old natural-history museum. The government wants to move the valuable collection, which contains more than 10 million items that are important for
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(Photo : Pixabay/mariamichelle)Coral reefs need urgent attention as a huge percentage of it has been destroyed, risking underwater life. Scientists suggest that 70- 90% of all existing coral reef habitat will be eliminated over the next 20 years due to rising sea temperatures and acidic waters. To curb this, some groups are transplanting live corals
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Researchers first spotted this rocky outcrop in Pine Island Bay, West Antarctica, in early February.Credit: Gui Bortolotto A scientific expedition off the coast of Antarctica earlier this month spotted an island that appears on no maps — a finding that demonstrates how quickly the continent is changing as a result of climate change. “I think
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The petroleum-based adhesives used to make plywood could be replaced by a soya-based formula. Credit: Alamy Organic chemistry 21 February 2020 Chemists have borrowed a strategy from plant cell walls to produce a high-strength wood adhesive. An element that props up plants’ cell walls can turn soya protein into a strong and eco-friendly glue. The
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Hello Nature readers, would you like to get this Briefing in your inbox free every day? Sign up here Escherichia coli bacteria, coloured green, in a scanning electron micrograph.Credit: Stephanie Schuller/SPL A machine-learning approach has spotted powerful new types of antibiotic from a pool of more than 100 million molecules, including one that works against
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Methane bubbles trapped in ice. Methane that has long been stored in frozen ground is unlikely to be released in sufficient amounts to accelerate climate change. Credit: Alamy Climate change 21 February 2020 Bubbles in Antarctic ice suggest that warming will not result in massive release of long-buried methane. Runaway global warming driven by the
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Parallel to the rapid spread of coronavirus from Wuhan China to 25 countries across the globe, spread of myths and even scientific studies with no peer reviews or ‘preprints’ on the novel virus has become viral and is contributing to fear and panic across the globe. Even public health scientists have issued a statement condemning
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Researchers taught a neural network to recognize a type of knot called a 31, which can be modelled as a string of beads (left) or a string of rods (right). Credit: O. Vandans et al./Phys. Rev. E Physics 21 February 2020 After training, an artificial-intelligence program can distinguish between five types of knot with 99%
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