Nature

Data analysis has been the fallback for many researchers whose fieldwork has been halted because of COVID-19.Credit: Getty PhD student Maija Sequeira had planned to travel in January 2020 to a primary school in Colombia for 14 months to research how children learn about social hierarchies. But all public schools in the nation closed until
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A mud volcano in Shirvan National Park, Azerbaijan. Researchers have investigated how similar mud volcanoes could form under water. Credit: Alamy Geology 26 November 2020 Trapped gas causes buried sediments to flow like water, rising and erupting dangerously at the sea floor. Mud volcanoes are an unpredictable and dangerous phenomenon — but now scientists have
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A new method for detecting pyrethroid pesticides in honey that is very harmful to honeybees is now available. University of Waterloo researchers developed a fully automated and environment-friendly technique to extract pyrethroids from samples of honey. Massive Die-Offs of Bees Colony collapse disorder or CCD is a condition wherein the worker honeybees do not return
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The entire country is expected to have a dry Thanksgiving Day this year. However, central and southern US states may experience severe storms before Thanksgiving Day.  Severe thunderstorms may likely interfere with the Thanksgiving preparation of residents from northern Texas to the southern parts of Illinois and Indiana and western portions of Kentucky, Tennessee, and Alabama
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The Nature Index is a database of author affiliations and institutional relationships. The index tracks contributions to research articles published in 82 high-quality natural-science journals, chosen by an independent group of researchers. The Nature Index provides absolute and fractional counts of article publication at the institutional and national level and, as such, is an indicator
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Young megalodon sharks (artist’s impression) spent time in sheltered coastal areas while they grew to their gigantic adult proportions. Credit: Humberto Ferrón Palaeontology 25 November 2020 Ancient teeth hint that a handful of sites served as sheltered sanctuaries for immature megalodon sharks. The prehistoric shark Otodus megalodon was an awe-inspiring beast, measuring up to three
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Scientists have found that animals can surprisingly adapt to the increased temperatures caused by climate change. A 2019 UN report estimated that one million species are currently in danger of extinction. Researchers published in the journal Nature found that tropical ocean ecosystems could collapse by 2030, while mountains and forests will follow by 2050.  Consistently, other reports stated that with the current status
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A new paper documented the effects of changes in the behavior of fires, from being too large or too little, that threatens biodiversity and ecosystems, including over 4,400 species of birds, mammals, insects, and plants worldwide. According to a paper published by a 27-member international team led by researchers from the University of Melbourne, changes in the behavior of fire
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Burning the Books Richard Ovenden John Murray (2020) In 1660, when the British monarchy was restored, the University of Oxford ordered the burning of books by anti-royalist, pro-free-speech poet John Milton. This is one of many graphic examples inspired by the collections at the institution’s Bodleian Library, cited in Bodleian librarian Richard Ovenden’s powerful history,
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A soldier ant of the species Atta cephalotes (right) extends its mandibles towards an Acromyrmex echinatior worker ant. Mineralized body armour protects some A. echinatior workers from attack. Credit: Caitlin M. Carlson Biomaterials 24 November 2020 A species of leaf-cutter ant is the first known example of an insect with mineralized armour, which shields them
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A Long March-5 rocket carrying Chang’e 5 lifts off.Credit: Mark Schiefelbein/AP/Shutterstock A Chinese spacecraft is on its way to the Moon after launching off the coast of Hainan Island, in southern China, this morning at 4:30 AM local time. Chang’e-5’s mission is to retrieve rocks from the Moon and return them to Earth. If successful,
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As chair of fire and structures at the University of Edinburgh, UK, I work in three laboratory spaces. We do everything from small-scale experiments on various building materials to see how easily they ignite or spread fire, to large-scale analyses of the load-bearing systems of skyscrapers using complex computer simulations. Around 2008, my group moved
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Tropical Cyclone Gati made landfall in Somalia on Sunday at sustained winds of 105 mph. Gati, the strongest tropical cyclone ever recorded in the northern Indian Oceans, had sustained winds of 115 mph. The storm is moving westward towards the coastal areas of Puntland and Somaliland. #Cyclone #GATI about to landfall in #Somalia right now. A very powerful cyclone…
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A coronavirus related to SARS-CoV-2 has been found in Shamel’s horseshoe bats captured in Cambodia in 2010.Credit: Merlin D. Tuttle/SPL Two lab freezers in Asia have yielded surprising discoveries. Researchers have told Nature they have found a coronavirus that is closely related to SARS-CoV-2, the virus responsible for the pandemic, in horseshoe bats stored in
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After a century, Antarctica’s blue whales have been seen in South Georgia once again after near extinction. Largest-known animal seen again The Blue Whale (Balaenoptera musculus), the largest known animal on the planet, is critically endangered. They have been seen in the waters near South Georgia Island near Antarctica, after nearly a hundred years of being nearly hunted
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In New Mexico, a lava tube shows evidence of Ancestral Puebloans surviving climate change by melting ice for their water needs. For over ten millennia, the people of the arid landscape of what is now western New Mexico have been famous for having unique architecture, complex societies, and political and economic systems.  Studying the ancient Puebloans In the El Malpais,
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Monarch caterpillars have been demonstrated to head-butt one another as they fight for scarce milkweed food supply. The dwindling food source causes the insects to become aggressive towards others, as observed by scientists in laboratory experiments. READ: Study Debunks Migration Mortality as Major Cause of Butterfly Monarch’s Population Decline Scarce food supply  To become a butterfly, Monarch caterpillars need
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A presentation is not a journal article — so don’t prepare for them in the same way.Credit: Getty In 20 years of coaching biomedical researchers on presentation techniques, I have continually been frustrated by scientists trying to make presentations as comprehensive as journal articles. Their thinking is understandable: “Better too much than too little, and
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Kelsey Huntington, a pathology PhD student, applied her knowledge of the immune system in colorectal cancer to COVID-19 research.Credit: Kelsey Huntington As a postdoctoral researcher in disease ecology at the University of Montpellier, France, Amandine Gamble spent the first two months of 2019 hunting down unsuspecting albatrosses on the Falkland Islands. Gamble was finishing some
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The number of deaths across Central America and Colombia has reached more than 40 and the death toll is rising as rescuers race against time to reach far-flung areas that were isolated. Most of the dead were recorded in Nicaragua and Honduras. Honduran President and leaders from Central American Countries plead for aid. In Nicaragua, 160,000
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Chlordecone is a chemical manufactured as a white powder used by Caribbean plantation workers in Martinique and Guadaloupe and applied under banana plantation trees as protection against insects. Cause of prostate cancer Ambroise Bertin is a banana plantation worker who worked with chlordecone for several years. He contracted prostate cancer, which is more common in his home in Martinique and Guadeloupe compared to any other place
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A copper collecting plate (long central structure) paired with a transparent, heat-trapping material (white strip, top) harvests enough solar heat to make steam. Credit: Lin Zhao Renewable energy 20 November 2020 A sunlight-powered device equipped with an a lightweight gel makes steam hot enough to kill dangerous microbes. An airy insulating material doubles the efficiency
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Volcanic eruptions burned coal and oil in what is now Siberia, which helped usher the Permian-Triassic Mass Extinction Event or the “Great Dying.” The mass extinction Paleontologists termed the event like the Great Dying or Permian-Triassic mass extinction. This occurred approximately 252 million years in the past, where in the span of tens of millennia, 96% of every marine
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The invasive species Argentine tegu lizard has spread throughout Florida’s southern region and has even spilled over the US southeast. It poses a threat to farmers and native species. They have bred continuously in many states once they have escaped or have been released.  Argentine tegu behavior  Argentine tegus come from South America. They are known to be
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At least 30 people were dead as Hurricane Iota, the strongest Atlantic hurricane of the year, batters Central America. Deaths were from Nicaragua, Honduras, Colombian, Panama, and El Salvador. More than 60,000 were evacuated even after Iota struck Nicaragua. Same path as Hurricane Eta  Hurricane Iota shared almost the same path as that of Hurricane Eta, which struck on
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A comprehensive study by University of Illinois researchers examined water withdrawals by US agriculture, crop and livestock activities spanning the years 1995 to 2010. The decline in the use of water The research team found a trend of declining use of water due to various factors. Their research was published in the journal Environmental Science and Technology. According to study co-author and University of Illinois
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Listen to a special episode on facial recognition technology, with Benjamin Thompson and Richard Van Noorden. Your browser does not support the audio element. Download MP3 In this episode: 03:24 Standing up against ‘smart cities’ Cities across the globe are installing thousands of surveillance cameras equipped with facial recognition technology. Although marketed as a way
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The onset of any type of cancer brings a feeling of dread. The body that had so loyally served you, give or take a few aches and pains, suddenly threatens to kill you. Therapeutic advances have lowered the stakes considerably for several malignancies, including breast cancer, prostate cancer and leukaemia. But lung cancer remains a
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Renowned marine researcher Daniel Pauly believes that future fishing practices will be through artisanal fishing boats with subsidies to industrial fishing fleets eliminated. Pauly, a University of British Columbia professor, says that fish product stocks are a worldwide problem that is threatening food security because of the excessive fishing effort of subsidized fleets. According to him, the fisheries industry will improve as subsidies are ended and the politicians
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DIY hardware, such as this 3D-printed fluorescence microscope, is bringing cutting-edge research and diagnostics to resource-limited areas.Credit: Stuart Robinson/Univ. Sussex Eyes trained on the cells under his microscope, Gustavo Batista Menezes had more on his mind than just science. Menezes was using a specialized confocal microscope at the University of Calgary, Canada, that cost nearly
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Youthful sleep in ageing people is linked to a lower prevalence of diabetes and other health conditions. Credit: Raquel Maria Carbonell Pagola/LightRocket/Getty Ageing 17 November 2020 Older people with ‘young’ sleep patterns have more robust cognition than those whose rest is typical for their age. Older people with sleep patterns like those of younger people
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Soft Matter Tom McLeish Oxford Univ. Press (2020) Freeze a rose in liquid nitrogen then tap it with a hammer, and the petals shatter. “Its softness is a function of its temperature, not just its molecular constituents and structure,” observes theoretical physicist Tom McLeish, one of the researchers who founded ‘soft-matter physics’ in the 1990s.
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Mission scientists monitor the spacecraft Cassini as it plunges into Saturn’s atmosphere.Credit: Joel Kowsky/NASA Shaping Science: Organizations, Decisions, and Culture on NASA’s Teams Janet Vertesi Univ. Chicago Press (2020) In 25 years of covering US planetary science, I’ve become used to seeing certain faces in press briefings, at conferences and on webcasts presenting discoveries from
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